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Welcome to our world

Consider Michael Burgess. In a July 8 meeting with the Denton Record-Chronicle Editorial Board, he confesses, “I’m not going to lie to you. There’s days that it’s rough. There’s days that I wake up and check the Twitter feed first thing.”

Welcome to our world, congressman. It may be as close as he’s come to criticizing the president, but what can he do? The Republican won re-election over his Democratic opponent by more than 60,000 votes — people who are securely in the Trump base. Burgess gets no help from our senators. John Cornyn calls the comments an “unforced error,” as if officiating a combative game of Tiddlywinks. Ted Cruz says the Squad made comments diminishing 9/11, having forgotten that on that day Trump told a New York radio station that he now had the tallest building in Manhattan.

Not a week goes by when Burgess and the rest of us wake to find Trump insulting four freshmen congresswomen, all women of color. Not for nothing is there a Confederate monument on the courthouse Square.

Trump doubles down, relishing a “send them back” chant at his campaign rally. He chooses to dignify a question about whether Ilhan Omar married her brother. The media begin to call for Republicans to express shame.

It’s not gonna happen. It didn’t just recently when Trump was accused of rape. Didn’t happen after multiple other accusations of sexual assault. Didn’t happen when he called the media enemies of the people. Didn’t happen when he enabled destruction of the environment, when he violated international treaties, when he obstructed justice, demeaned federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies, disregarded national security, attacked our allies, fell in love with murderous dictators, greatly increased the national debt, utterly degraded public discourse, put children in cages, embraced nepotism, lied nearly every time his lips moved.

And this time, Republicans are expected to feel shame? As for Burgess’ comment, “there’s days that it’s rough,” welcome to our world, congressman.

Mark Spencer,

Cross Roads

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