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Seaman Bradi Mills, a 2017 Ryan High School graduate, is serving at Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Jacksonville.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A 2017 Ryan High School graduate is serving at Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Jacksonville.

Seaman Bradi Mills serves as an undesignated sailor that is responsible for command personnel accountability. Undesignated sailors are those who have no specific job title and are assigned where they are needed most.

Mills credits their hometown for giving opportunities they would not have had otherwise experienced that has helped in serving with the Navy.

“Growing up in Denton, my dad taught me to have integrity in everything you do,” Mills said.

Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Jacksonville deliver quality health care, in an integrated system of readiness and health. Naval Hospital Jacksonville includes five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. It serves 163,000 active-duty and retired sailors, Marines, soldiers, airmen, guardsmen and their families, including about 83,000 patients who are enrolled with a primary care manager.

Mills is now a part of a long-standing tradition of serving the Navy our nation needs.

“My father served in the Navy, which is why I choose to enlist,” Mills said. “It was hearing the stories about his experience that made me want to become a sailor.”

Mills said they are proud to be part of a war-fighting team that readily defends America at all times.

“I deployed on the USS Iwo Jima and completed a six-month deployment,” Mills said. “It was challenging, but it’s probably what I’m most proud of in my service.”

Mills is playing an important part in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

“Our priorities center on people, capabilities and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon capital assets, Mills and others know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes.

“Our 2,400 staff [military, civilian, contract, and volunteer] are integral to keeping our Navy and Marine Corps family ready, healthy, and on the job,” said Capt. Matthew Case, Naval Hospital Jacksonville commander and NMRTC Jacksonville commanding officer.

“Serving in the Navy means overcoming the challenges I’ve experienced and becoming independent,” Mills said.

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